2019        Dr Julie Crough, Dr Christopher Love. Improving student engagement and self-regulated learning through technology-enhanced student partnerships. In ICICTE Proceedings, 2019.


Abstract: Teaching and learning in higher education for the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics disciplines are renowned for their challenges. This paper explores how embedding a personal learning platform (PebblePad) through a Students as Partners(SaP)initiative has resulted in a higher degree of student engagement in a second-year biochemistry course and unexpected benefits for students based on reflections about their experience. Adopting a digital platform enabled surprisingly honest, uninhibited and extensive student reflections. In addition, while the coupling of the SaP initiative with educational technology has exceeded expectations, early findings suggest that the process is also contributing positively to students’ self-regulated learning.



2019      Bryan Chan, Dr Li Wei, & Marlene Daicopoulos.  Something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue: A marriage of innovation in nursing EBP and digital literacy education.  In: 40th International Association of University Libraries Conference, 23-27 June 2019, Perth.


From the Abstract:  Using the analogy of a marriage, this paper will present the case study of a collaborative project between the University Library and the College of Science, Health, Engineering & Education (the ‘wedding party’) to develop a self-paced, interactive online tutorial on database searching and systematic reviews, as applied in nursing practice.

Four key elements went into planning this marriage:

  • Something old: Camtasia (familiar to both Library and College)
  • Something new: LibWizard (a new Library software acquisition) 
  • Something borrowed: PebblePad (managed by the College)
  • Something blue: Digital badging (micro-credentialing)

These elements were integrated into a single digital learning object, which was launched in late January 2019 (the ‘wedding’).



2019      Pauline Roberts, Gillian Kirk. Introducing an ePortfolio into Practicum-BasedUnits: Pre-service Teachers’ Perceptions of Effective Support. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, Vol 44, Issue 5


Abstract: ePortfolios are gaining momentum as a preferred way for graduates to demonstrate current and developing capabilities against industry standards. Effective training is essential for new graduates to produce quality and competitive ePortfolios. This research focused on the perspective of pre-service teachers on the effectiveness of learning opportunities provided to increase confidence and skills in developing an ePortfolio in an Australian four-year undergraduate degree. The initial phase of this research employed a survey to examine the perspective of 132 second-year and 105 third-year pre-service teachers. Results indicated that for the second-year cohort there was a minimal increase in the levels of confidence across all areas. In contrast, the third-year pre-service teachers showed some increase in confidence in developing an ePortfolio and understanding its purpose. While the findings from this study emphasised the pre-service teachers’ need for ongoing hands-on support, it also highlighted their reluctance to seek support at an independent level.



2019     John McInerney, Ruth Druva. Clinical educators’ attitudes towards the use of technology in the clinical teaching environment. A mixed methods study. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences, (Early view)


Abstract: In healthcare, there is ongoing flux in expectations for students and practitioners. Establishing integrated systems of monitoring and evidencing students’ development is imperative. With current trends towards the use of technology in tertiary education, online learning environments (OLEs) could constitute more effective evidencing of student progress in the clinical environment. However, there is little research exploring clinical educators' experiences with implementing technology in clinical education.


The research aimed to:

  • Examine clinical educators’ attitudes towards technology and its use in clinical education.
  • Explore clinical educators’ experiences of implementing technologies in a clinical environment.


2019     Ana Maria Ducasse, Kathryn Hill. Developing student feedback literacy using educational technology and the reflective feedback conversation. Practitioner Research in Higher Education, Vol 12, No 1, (2019)


Abstract: While its importance for promoting learning is well-documented, feedback can only promote learning to the extent that it is acted on by learners. However, the fact that students may have difficulty understanding feedback or knowing how to act on it and are not necessarily receptive to the feedback provided underscore the importance of including the learner perspective in feedback practices.
This paper describes an intervention which used the ‘reflective feedback conversation’ and educational technologies to provide written feedback to students in University level Spanish language classes. The aim of the study was to improve learner uptake of feedback, develop student agency and self-regulation, increase alignment between teacher and student goals and expectations, and encourage learners to take a more active role in feedback processes as well as reduce teacher workload.



2018      Elizabeth Devonshire and Michael K. Nicholas. Continuing education in pain management: using a competency framework to guide professional development. Pain Reports, 2018 Sep-Oct; 3(5)


From the Introduction: In this article, we explore the complexities associated with the provision of effective CPD from a pain management perspective. First, we review the growing body of literature discussing the importance of outcome-based education and examine how this relates to the development of expertise. Then, we consider the implications of this theoretical framework for the provision of, and engagement in, CPD and how the core competencies for pain management can be applied in this context. This point may be important with shift towards microcredentialing for CPD activities. We suggest that not only does a competency-based approach provide a useful way for pain educators to conceptualise the design and evaluation of CPD activities, but also it enables pain practitioners to assess the value and utility of CPD opportunities in terms of their own professional development needs. We submit that this is especially relevant for those pain practitioners who have not had the opportunity for formal pain management education in their primary degree or subsequently.



2018      Christopher N. Allan, Chris Campbell, and David Green. Nurturing the budding ideas of STEM academics in a university-wide implementation of PebblePad. In ICICTE Proceedings, 2018.


Abstract: New technologies are often being implemented across universities from a top-down perspective,and often this prevents the nurturing of ideas and passions of academic staff.This paper explores a model to support STEM academics implement a new technology that could be used for any technology change. Data from the implementation is reported to confirm the success of this model with significant interest being shown across the STEM disciplines. Results show that employability, scaffolding laboratory skills, developing self-reflection, supporting weekly tasks and program wide initiatives were the major interests chosen by academics within Griffith Sciences.



2018      Chris Campbell and Arie Korf. Supporting student learning through innovative technology in the aviation classroom. In ICICTE Proceedings, 2018.


Abstract: This paper reportson the implementation of the new Flight Procedures Laboratory at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. This computer lab has been outfitted with hardwareand software to supportthestudent learning of flight procedures in a practical, task-oriented way.Data has been collected from the first cohort of students using this computerlab with a pre-and post-survey conducted. Student interviews were also conducted. Results from the survey as well as a description ofthe lab setupareincluded in this paper along withinformation about how this type of teaching facility may help our future pilots.



2018      Simon Howell, Geoffrey Tansley, Graham Jenkins, and Wayne Hall. An integrated professional practice and employability initiative in an engineering undergraduate program. In Proceedings of the 14th International CDIO         Conference, 2018.


Abstract: To attain accreditation, Engineering programmes in Australia must meet Engineers Australia’s Stage 1 Competency Standards. In addition to the academic criteria, there is an expectation that students meet professional practice requirements. In theSchool of Engineeringand Built Environmentat Griffith University, the professional practice requirement is that students “must complete a minimum of 12 weeks (60 days) of approved experience in an engineering practice environment (or a satisfactory alternative) during their degree studies.” While there have beenseveralopportunities  for  scaffolded  student-industry  interaction  in  earlier  years  of  the programme,  the  opportunities  were  not  integrated  into  the  programme, were inconsistent across the disciplines, and not coherently articulated as professional practice and employability opportunities for students.The result was that some students entered the final year of the programme  withoutsufficient  industry  internship  experience,  or  exposure to  industry professionals, or a lack ofunderstanding of professional expectationsand practice.The paper discussesthe introduction  and  implementation  of anintegratedProfessional  Practice  and Employability Skills stream within the programme to improve graduate employability and better support students as they develop into engineering professionals.The paper also describes amethod for monitoring and assessing professional practicesupported by a reflective ePortfolio.



2018      Martina F. Mylrea, Tarun S. Gupta, and Beverley D. Glass. Design and evaluation of a novel professional identity development program for pharmacy students. The American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, 2018.


Objective: The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate a Professional Identity Program (PIP), based on Self-determination theory (SDT), for commencing pharmacy students.



2018      Mauricio Novoa. Innovating industrial design curriculum in a Knowledge-Based and participatory digital era.. Design and Technology Education: an International Journal, 23(3), November 2018.

                

Abstract: This article narrates on three years participatory research between 2012 and 2014 and its formulation for a 2016 undergraduate industrial design curriculum launch. It contributes to design culture transformation since there are leading breakthrough education exemplars but lack of pathways to get there by conservative courses and institutions. The course proposes an individual and collective knowledge creation model through social constructivism and constructionism that recognises its place in time and history. It intends catching up with a profession transformed beyond a digital Bauhaus manifesto that bridges physical and digital artefacts, space and environments through quality of experiences, intelligence, networks and relations. Data and practice supported pedagogy redefinition from master-apprentice and teacher-centred skill transmission models to heutagogy and paragogy. The new approach required habitus change from a traditional goods-centred discipline to human-centred focus, critical design and making, design heuristics, CDIO (conceiving, designing, implementing, operating) and STEAM (science, technology, arts, mathematics) frameworks. Participants worked empathetically to contextualise, problem frame and solve by crossing boundaries between disciplines, institutions, industries, and students’ background and society. Research and practice promoted new forms of industrial design creation happening in physical and digital coexisting spaces of being. The curriculum expressed through units that evolved around an e-curriculum component working as a digital spine that progressed from standard social networking and industry collaboration to international design studio and design factory projects. It became foundation for future physical-digital industrial design artefacts, human computer interaction, machine learning, and systems built on hacker culture, shared information, free open-source software and hardware.



2018      Richard Pountney and Alison Grasmeder. Building bridges - enhancing mentoring skills, knowledge and practice through an online course. CollectivEd, 3:50–56, 2018.


Abstract: This paper outlines the rationale for an open online course for teachers, Enhance your Mentoring Skills, aimed at addressing the UK National Mentor Standards (2016), and describes how this was put into practice. The professional needs of school-based mentors and how these were met in the design for learning are examined alongside a consideration of the efficacy of the curriculum and associated pedagogy of the course. Drawing on the evaluations of 73 teachers who have completed the course in 2017 and their contributions to individual and communal learning activities the paper deǀelops an impression of mentoring practice that represents mentors' theories-in -use. Teachers' accounts of the value of the course suggest considerable effect on their levels of confidence and some evidence of impact on their mentoring practice. However, findings also indicate that participants' understanding of their mentoring role lacks a clearly defined model for mentoring relationships and that mentors welcome greater opportunity to reflect on their practice and to share this with others discursively. The paper discusses the extent to which the course offers a bridge between mentors' wishes and intentions and how they are realised in practice. ‘Recommendations for future iterations of the course are made, with proposals to develop this case study further, as an instrumental form of theory building (Stake, 1995), in order to better understand how mentors understand and develop their practice.



2018      Jennifer Rowley and Jennifer Munday. The evolved landscape of ePortfolios: Current values and purposes of academic teachers and curriculum designers. Journal of Teaching and Learning for Graduate Employability, 9(1), 2018.


Abstract: As ePortfolios are increasingly being used in universities to help develop self-reflective practitioners, academic teachers and students need to develop the skills and processes required to implement them. During 2015, a series of webinars was presented by a cross-university team to provide professional development for academic teachers, curriculum designers and other staff interested in initiating or extending ePortfolio learning in their institutions. A survey was conducted with participants to gauge the depth of understanding and use of ePortfolios in degree programs. The survey aimed to clarify participants’ perception of the value of ePortfolio tools in Australian universities, and to identify future directions for developing knowledge and learning related to ePortfolios. Through the survey questions participants were able to provide information anonymously about their knowledge and use of ePortfolios. Respondents were also invited to be interviewed. Nine interviews, conducted in 2016, explored ePortfolio-users’ opinions of the learning tool. The results indicate that teachers’ use of the ePortfolio as a learning tool has evolved beyond that reported in the current literature. Furthermore, when used for reflection, assessment and documenting professional standards, the ePortfolio tool contributes to the students’ development of skills required to transition to future careers.



2017      Jo Byrd. Challenges to implementing a new technology in teacher education. phase one: ’meaningful’ digital reflections. Teacher Education Advancement Network Journal, 9(2), 2017.


Abstract:  This paper describes the challenges of introducing a digital tool to trainee teachers.  A group of nineteen undergraduate students studying primary education and in their third year of a four year course was introduced to PebblePad5. PebblePad is an online tool which is not new in the world of ITE.  However, the latest version has more useful features and is less ‘clunky’ than older versions.  The students each had their own private account where eventually they would be expected to store all of their placement files, add multi-modal content and then choose to share some or all of this content publically or by personal invitation via email.  One of the benefits for us as an ITE provider is that we can view our students’ files electronically and comment on them without necessarily making the one/two hour round trip to the placement school.  Although students used some technology, this research shows that students need more training in using technology competently in the workplace setting. Phase One of the project was to encourage the students to write their reflections on placement digitally.  It was hoped that the students would be enthusiastic about using PebblePad and I would see an improvement in the levels of engagement with the reflective process and thus, the quality of teaching and learning as a result of this.  Data obtained from questionnaires and a focus group indicate that PebblePad was viewed as a useful tool, but training issues and time constraints of the project meant it was not as successful for this cohort as was hoped.  This paper discusses the issues that arose and the plan to overcome these barriers in the next phase of the implementation of PebblePad. 


               

2017      Ron J. M. Knevel, Sarah Down, Priscilla Trahar, and Goksu Dines. Achieving a 360-degree feedback framework using PebblePad in oral health and dentistry. In Owning, supporting and sharing the journey, eportfolios Australia forum 2017, 2017.

                

Abstract:  This study investigates oral health therapy and dentistry student’s perception about using PebblePad to enhance their learning in a clinical environment. Methods: Oral health students and dentistry students were asked to complete an anonymous online survey; 89 students were invited to participate, 57 students completed the survey (response rate 64%). The survey contained forced response questions using a 5-point Likert scale. Respondents were invited to provide clarifying comments for some of the questions. Results: The majority of students surveyed were positive about the PebblePad digital logbook. Students appreciate how the logbook improves tracking of their progress and supports them to identify areas of concern. The ability to read feedback from clinical educators and to refer back to it at any point in time benefits their learning. Students suggested several areas for improvement: the importance of example entries, reducing weekly diaries to monthly blogs and logbooks and more information about how to write appropriate reflections. Conclusion: The 360-degree feedback framework in PebblePad aims to position students as active learners engaged in regular reflection. Feedback is provided by the teaching team, external clinical practitioners, peers, patients and the students themselves (self-assessment). This ensures that students have multiple opportunities to reflect and receive feedback in a variety of settings. The digital logbook in PebblePad is an effective tool to improve tracking the progress of oral health and dentistry students and to encourage reflective practice. This study shows that the acceptance and appreciation for the digital logbook improves if embedded in a more formal competency based curriculum. 



2017      Jennifer Munday. An embedded ePortfolio in a master’s degree: Is it working? International Journal of ePortfolio, 7(2):175–185, 2017.


Abstract:  ePortfolios are embedded into several degree programs at Charles Sturt University in Australia to maximize the value of ePortfolio purposes for students working in or towards a profession. ePortfolio design has been embedded into a Master of Education curriculum for five years. Graduates of this degree program are classroom teachers, and some have leadership positions in education.  The aim of this article is to report findings of a research project investigating continued use of the Master of Education ePortfolio processes; it ascertains whether the ePortfolio capstone task was an effective means for students to: draw together key elements of their study within the Masters program; and to reflect and identify changes in philosophy, thinking, or practice in professional work. Finally, the project studies whether recognizing the skills they used to create the ePortfolio encouraged the students to use those skills with their peers and colleagues or in teaching situations.  The research took a Case Study approach, collecting graduate interviews and capstone ePortfolios.  Analysis provided details about effective aspects and processes that embedded the ePortfolio into the higher degree program.  ePortfolio curriculum and design require considerable planning if academic educators are to support the use of ePortfolios in Higher Education.


                

2017      Gail Ring, Chelsea Waugaman, and Bob Brackett. The value of career ePortfolios on job applicant performance: Using data to determine effectiveness. International Journal of ePortfolio, 7(2):225–236, 2017.


Abstract:  This research project investigated how the development of an ePortfolio, combined with ePortfolio pedagogies, impacted the interview performance of undergraduate students as they prepared to enter the  job market.  Participants were students in the Health Sciences and Biosystems Engineering programs at Clemson University, enrolled in ePortfolio-developing capstone or internship classes in the 2014-2015 or 2015-2016 academic years. Participants were randomly assigned to complete mock interviews after engaging in different interventions, such as cover letter and resume development andePortfolio   pedagogy.   A one-way ANOVA   revealed that students demonstrated statistically significant higher quality interview skills after engaging in ePortfolio pedagogy mentoring sessions, compared to students who received limited or no interventions. ePortfolios created in 2014, without the study’s ePortfolio pedagogy training, were compared against the portfolios from this research project. T-test analysis revealed statistically significant improvements in overall ePortfolio quality in the courses utilizing the study’s ePortfolio pedagogy.


                

2017      Neil M. Speirs, Simon C. Riley, and Gavin McCabe. Student-Led individually created courses: using structured reflection within experiential learning to enable widening participation students transitions through and beyond higher education. Journal of Perspectives in Applied Academic Practice, 5(2), 2017.


Abstract:  The notion of students as partners in the co-creation of curricula and indeed co-evaluating or co-grading has shown positive outcomes that include increased engagement and motivation (Cook-Sather, Bovill, & Felten, 2014; Cook-Sather 2014; Cook-Sather & Motz-Storey 2016). In order for a student to be a pedagogical co-designer or indeed a change agent it is reasonable to suggest that they must already possess a substantial level of social and cultural capital (Woolcock, 2001) to enable this engagement. However, students from lower socio-economic status backgrounds are more likely to lack such capital and to not understand the “rules of the game” (Bourdieu, 1990; Bourdieu, 1984). In this situation, the value or pay-off of being involved in such co-design in terms of attribute development through a novel sense of experiential learning, may not be fully appreciated. Therefore, there are likely limits to the extent that co-creation and radical collegiality (Fielding, 1999), will lead to the democratisation of curricula and enhance students’ experiences, irrespective of social background. Despite the barriers outlined above, Student-Led, Individually-Created Courses (SLICCs) are an emerging area of practice at the University of Edinburgh through which widening participation (WP) students are successfully being engaged in the graduate attributes and employability agendas and ultimately in the pedagogical co-design of their own credit-bearing curriculum. SLICCs provide a flexible reflective-learning framework for experiential learning that enables individuals and groups of students to work across disciplinary and structural boundaries. These courses broaden the scope of what is considered to be ‘curricular’, bringing what was previously co- and extra-curricular into the credit-bearing provision. This paper will explore how WP students are engaged in the radical collegiality of SLICCs, despite the many barriers related to capital, through a rational pedagogy as outlined by Bourdieu and Passeron (1979). 


                

2016      John L. Kertesz. Three key conditions to revitalise an ePortfolio program in response to increasing regulation of teacher education. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 41(8), 2016.


Abstract:  This paper describes a study undertaken within the education faculty of a mid-sized university in response to the recommendations of the Teacher Education Ministerial Advisory Group (TEMAG) (2014) that initial teacher education (ITE) graduates emerge with an evidence-based professional standards-focused portfolio of teaching competency. In concluding that current teacher educator usage of, and attitudes to, ePortfolios limit the capacity of this particular faculty to respond to this challenge, the paper proposes three critical conditions to revitalise a stalled ePortfolio program and prepare for an increasingly demanding future. In sharing this experience, the paper seeks to support discussion of how teacher educators can respond best to the professional portfolio challenge in an environment of increasing regulation.


                

2016      Candyce Reynolds and Melissa S. Pirie. Creating an eportfolio culture on campus through platform selection and implementation. Peer review, 18(3), 2016.


Introduction:  Given the initial excitement in the early 2000s about the potential of eportfolios for advancing integrative learning and authentic assessment in higher education, one might imagine that eportfolios would be ubiquitous in the academy, replacing final exams, cumbersome assessment processes, resumes, and even transcripts. The reality is much more meager. A recent Educause survey (Dahlstrom, Walker, and Dziuban 2013) reports that 57 percent of higher education campuses have “made some use” of eportfolios, but only at a program or course level. However, the promise of eportfolios as a broadly used tool for enhancing student learning and advancing authentic assessment is yet to be seen. The rate of eportfolio adoption follows Rogers’ (2003) Diffusion of Innovation theory, which describes the process of adopting of new technologies over time with the standard bell curve illustrating the process. The theory asserts that innovation starts with innovators, of course, and that, by definition, they are limited in numbers. The next group to follow a new technology are the early adopters.

It is at this stage that many campus eportfolio projects get stuck. A few enthusiastic stalwarts rally their colleagues and harangue their students to adopt this amazing learning tool but often end up continuing to talk with each other at that next eportfolio faculty development event. The theory posits that there is a breaking point, called the chasm, that must be gotten through to get to the pinnacle—early and late majority adoption of technology. (At the tail end of the technology adoption model are the laggards.) The question becomes, how do we spread the use of eportfolios beyond our innovators and early adopters? This article describes one institution’s current attempt to move a long-standing practice of eportfolios to a majority of users, along with what we have learned in our journey. Perhaps our lessons will help those who also wish to move their eportfolio use in higher education forward.


                

2016      Joy Robbins and John Dermo. Freeing the hoop jumpers: Eportfolio assessment to raise learner engagement on PgCert HE programmes. Student Engagement in Higher Education Journal, 1(1), 2016.     


Abstract:  The idea of professional development has gradually become an accepted and established part of teaching in higher education (Dearing, 1997; DfES, 2003; Browne, 2010). It is now the norm for new university teaching staff in the UK to complete a postgraduate certificate in Higher Education Practice, Learning and Teaching in HE, or Academic Practice as recommended or even mandatory initial professional development (Laycock & Shrives, 2009). While these certificate programmes are now well-established in the sector and are valued for raising the profile of university teaching and educational scholarship (Shrives, 2012), it is not uncommon for learners to view them as a hoop-jumping exercise, and therefore adopt strategic approaches to get through the programme, resulting in disappointing learning gains. We present an analysis of the barriers to engagement that can cause PgCert learners to take such a hoop jumping approach to their programme, drawing from policy, literature, and participant views. We then propose a teaching and assessment model to address these barriers using an eportfolio approach. While eportfolio use is not new in PgCert programmes and staff development, for example being used notably at York St. John University where learners create a portfolio to evidence how they meet the UK Professional Standards Framework (UKPSF) and use it as an ‘aide memoire’ in a summatively assessed dialogue (Asghar, 2014), the challenges to engagement for our learners that the current study found lead us to propose a different portfolio approach. There is of course no single right way to design deep learning into a PgCert programme, but we hope that the research-informed eportfolio model presented here may be useful to other practitioners who seek, like us, to remove the hoops from reflective teaching practice.


                 

2016      Pauline Roberts. Reflection: A renewed and practical focus for an existing problem in teacher education. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 41(7), 2016.


Abstract:  Reflection has been a component of teacher education programs for many years. The introduction of the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) and the National Quality Standard (NQS) into Western Australian schools appear to have brought a renewed focus to this. For universities involved in teacher education, reflection remains a complex construct that requires scaffolding and nurturing. The question remains, however, how to effectively do this.

This paper provides a practical focus to developing reflection by outlining strategies that address this issue. Through the scaffolded implementation of an Action Research project for pre-service teachers, this research project identified a number of key recommendations. Firstly, there is a need for a strong model of reflection to be used consistently across degree programs; secondly, reflective processes should be embedded in practice; and finally, universities need to be mindful of the assessment of reflection and the impact that this assessment has on the reflective process.